Lunar and Planetary Institute






Comets - Books

Books

Comets
Melanie Chrismer, Children's Press, 2008, ISBN 978-0531147597
Images and clear, simple text introduce comets for ages 4 to 8.

The Magic School Bus: Lost in the Solar System 
Joanna Cole and Bruce Degen, Scholastic, 1992, ISBN 0590414291
Miss Frizzle and her intrepid students tour the planets of our solar system in a book for ages 4–8.

Discover Science: Solar System
Dr. Mike Goldsmith, Kingfisher, 2010, ISBN 0753464470
The large font and engaging montages appeal to 4–8–year-olds as they explore the objects in our solar system, including the sun, planets, dwarf planet, and "space rubble". A few fun, simple activities are also provided.

Exploring Dangers in Space: Asteroids, Space Junk, and More
Buffy Silverman, Learner Publishing Group, Inc., 2012, ISBN 9780761354468
This book discusses space collisions, from the asteroids and comets that strike Earth and other planets to the work scientists are doing to protect our planet.

Our Solar System
Seymour Simon, William Morrow & Company, 2007, ISBN 0061140082

A well-illustrated overview of the planets, comets, and asteroids in our solar system for ages 8–11.

The Kids Book of the Night Sky
Ann Love and Jane Drake, Kids Can Press, 2004, ISBN 1553371283
Sky maps, myths, games, and kid-friendly activities connect children, ages 8 to 13, to the stars, Moon, and planets.

Exploring Our Solar System
Sally Ride and Tam O'Shaughnessy, Crown Books for Young Readers, 2003, ISBN 0375812040
This well-illustrated book takes children ages 9–12 on a tour of the planets (and our Sun!) in our solar system.

13 Planets: The Latest View of the Solar System
David Aguilar, National Geographic Children's Books, 2008, ISBN 1426302363
Children ages 9–12 will discover the eight planets of the solar system and also explore five dwarf planets. Lots of great images accompany the text.

The Grand Tour: A Traveler's Guide to the Solar System
Ron Miller and William K. Hartmann,Workman Publishing Company, 2005, ISBN 0761139095
Older children and adults can tour our solar system without ever having to leave the comfort of Earth! Information about the objects in our solar system is uniquely arranged in order of mass, rather than by distance from the Sun.

Last updated
November 1, 2012

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