Lunar and Planetary Institute






Inside Mars The Icing on the Plate - Why are the Volcanos on Mars so Tall?
EXPLORE! MARS INSIDE AND OUT

Inside Mars - The Icing on the Plate - Why are the Volcanos on Mars so Tall?

Correlations to National Science Standards

Grades K–4
Science as Inquiry Content Standard A
Understanding About Scientific Inquiry

  • Scientific investigations involve asking and answering a question and comparing the answer with what scientists already know about the world.
  • Scientists develop explanations using observations (evidence) and what they already know about the world (scientific knowledge). Good explanations are based on evidence from investigations.

Earth and Space Science Content Standard D
Changes in the Earth and Sky

  • The surface of the Earth changes. Some changes are due to slow processes, such as erosion and weathering, and some changes are due to rapid processes, such as landslides, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes.

Science and Technology Content Standard E
Understanding About Science and Technology

  • People have always had questions about their world. Science is one way of answering questions and explaining the natural world.

Grades 5–8
Science as Inquiry Content Standard A
Abilities Necessary to Do Scientific Inquiry

  • Scientific explanations emphasize evidence, have logically consistent arguments, and use scientific principles, models, and theories. The scientific community accepts and uses such explanations until displaced by better scientific ones. When such displacement occurs, science advances.

Earth and Space Science Content Standard D
Structure of the Earth System

  • The solid earth is layered with a lithosphere; hot, convecting mantle; and dense, metallic core.
  • Lithospheric plates on the scales of continents and oceans constantly move at rates of centimeters per year in response to movements in the mantle. Major geological events, such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and mountain building, result from these plate motions.[See Content Standard F (grades 58) ]
  • Land forms are the result of a combination of constructive and destructive forces. Constructive forces include crustal deformation, volcanic eruption, and deposition of sediment, while destructive forces include weathering and erosion.

Earth's History

  • The earth processes we see today, including erosion, movement of lithospheric plates, and changes in atmospheric composition, are similar to those that occurred in the past. Earth history is also influenced by occasional catastrophes, such as the impact of an asteroid or comet.

 

Last updated
October 2, 2009


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