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Wham! Moon!

Correlations to National Science Standards

Grades K-4
Science as Inquiry – Content Standard A
Understandings about Scientific Inquiry

  • Scientists develop explanations using observations (evidence) and what they already know about the world (scientific knowledge). Good explanations are based on evidence from investigations.
  • Scientists make the results of their investigations public; they describe the investigations in ways that enable others to repeat the investigations.
  • Scientists review and ask questions about the results of other scientists' work.

Earth and Space Science – Content Standard D
Properties of earth materials

  • Earth materials are solid rocks and soils, water, and the gases of the atmosphere.

Objects in the Sky

  • The sun, moon, stars, clouds, birds, and airplanes all have properties, locations, and movements that can be observed and described.

Changes in the Earth and Sky

  • The surface of the earth changes. Some changes are due to slow processes, such as erosion and weathering, and some changes are due to rapid processes, such as landslides, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes.

Science and Technology – Content Standard E
Understandings about Science and Technology

  • Scientists and engineers often work in teams with different individuals doing different things that contribute to the results.
  • Women and men of all ages, backgrounds, and groups engage in a variety of scientific and technological work.

Grades 5-8
Science as Inquiry – Content Standard A
Understandings about Scientific Inquiry

  • Different kinds of questions suggest different kinds of scientific investigations. Some investigations involve making models.
  • Current scientific knowledge and understanding guide scientific investigations.
  • Mathematics is important in all aspects of scientific inquiry.
  • Technology used to gather data enhances accuracy and allows scientists to analyze and quantify results of investigations.
  • Science advances through legitimate skepticism. Asking questions and querying other scientists' explanations is part of scientific inquiry. Scientists evaluate the explanations proposed by other scientists by examining evidence, comparing evidence, identifying faulty reasoning, pointing out statements that go beyond the evidence, and suggesting alternative explanations for the same observations.

Earth and Space Science – Content Standard D
Structure of the Earth System

  • The solid earth is layered with a lithosphere; hot, convecting mantle; and dense, metallic core.
  • Land forms are the result of a combination of constructive and destructive forces. Constructive forces include crustal deformation, volcanic eruption, and deposition of sediment, while destructive forces include weathering and erosion.

Earth’s History

  • The earth processes we see today, including erosion, movement of lithospheric plates, and changes in atmospheric composition, are similar to those that occurred in the past. Earth history is also influenced by occasional catastrophes, such as the impact of an asteroid or comet.

Earth in the Solar System

  • The earth is the third planet from the sun in a system that includes the moon, the sun, eight other planets and their moons, and smaller objects, such as asteroids and comets.
  • Gravity is the force that keeps planets in orbit around the sun and governs the rest of the motion in the solar system. Gravity alone holds us to the earth's surface and explains the phenomena of the tides.

History and Nature of Science – Content Standard G
Nature of Science

  • Scientists formulate and test their explanations of nature using observation, experiments, and theoretical and mathematical models.
  • In areas where active research is being pursued and in which there is not a great deal of experimental or observational evidence and understanding, it is normal for scientists to differ with one another about the interpretation of the evidence or theory being considered.
  • It is part of scientific inquiry to evaluate the results of scientific investigations, experiments, observations, theoretical models, and the explanations proposed by other scientists.

 

Last updated
August 27, 2010

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