Lunar and Planetary Institute






Resources
EXPLORE! To the Moon and Beyond with NASA's LRO Mission

Websites

Note: External resources are not necessarily 508 compliant.

Lunar Science and Exploration

Center for Lunar Origin and Evolution
This website was designed by students and faculty at the Denver School of Science and Technology in collaboration with the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) and the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI). This website introduces the science, scientists, and events and activities of CLOE, NLSI, and NASA in an effort to engage the public about the Moon. Learn more about lunar scientists and their work. An evolving collection of student articles covers the formation of the Moon, tides, and phases. Text appropriate for ages 14 and up; artwork appropriate for all ages.

Center for Lunar Science and Exploration
The Lunar and Planetary Institute offers a wealth of lunar resources. This NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) site has compiles existing lunar images, data, and studies. Visit the Lunar Map Catalog to find a number of lunar maps. This site is suitable for children 12 and up.

Inconstant Moon
Offers pictures, calendars, and music that can be enjoyed by all ages.

Explore NASA's Apollo Program
Information, audio and video files, journals, and other resources are available on NASA History Division: The Apollo Program. Download images and view information about the manned missions to the Moon in online catalogs such as the Lunar and Planetary Institute's Apollo Image Atlas and the National Air and Space Museum's Apollo atlas.

NASA's Lunar and Planetary Science pages provide an overview of past, present, and future lunar missions.

The research of NASA's Science Mission Directorate focuses on understanding the origin, evolution, and nature of our solar system, including our Moon.

Moon Zoo
Send families home from an Explore! Marvel Moon program with an opportunity to participate in lunar science through this online citizen science project. Moon Zoo uses about 70,000 high resolution images gathered by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. Citizen scientists are invited to categorize craters, boulders and more, including lava channels and even all sorts of different spacecraft sitting on the Moon's surface.

365 Days of Astronomy Podcast, The Origins of the Moon
Lunar scientist Bill Bottke from the Southwest Research Institute discusses the history of the Moon in this July 28, 2010 podcast. He describes older theories of the Moon's formation and summarizes the current scientific understanding of our Moon's ancient history. Appropriate for the facilitator and ages 14+.

365 Days of Astronomy Podcast, The Late Heavy Bombardment — Was It Real?
Planetary geologist Emily Lakdawalla explores what Moon rocks tell us about the Moon’s early history in this May 10, 2010 podcast. Appropriate for the facilitator and ages 14+.

What If the Moon Didn't Exist?

365 Days of Astronomy Podcast, What if the Moon did not exist?
This March 28, 2009 podcast explores the question, "what if the Moon did not exist?" The influence of the Moon on our length of the day, Earth's tilt, and cultural references are explored. Suitable for a general audience.

MyMoon Webcast with Dr. Neil Comins
Watch an archived recording of this March 24, 2010 event. Dr. Comins offers a brief description of the origin of the Moon and the implications for Earth if it did not exist. He responds to audience questions about the Giant Impact, tides, lunar exploration, and more! Appropriate for the facilitator and ages 14+.

The Moon’s Appearance in the Sky

SkyTellers: Moon Phases
The activities and resources found here will help children further explore the phases of our Moon after they have listened to the Native American tale of "The Girl Who Married the Moon" and the science story. The DVD and resource guide may be purchased through the SkyTellers website. Stories appropriate for ages 5 and up; resources geared toward facilitator.

MyMoon: World Tales of the Moon
There are hundreds of stories about the Moon and its appearance; some are sacred myths, and others are folktales old and new shared for the simple joy of the tale. This site offers links to several stories from across the globe, as well as a link to submit your own. The stories are reproduced with permission from the Wonder-Full Moon DVD. Appropriate for ages 8 and up.

Write an Instant Ode to the Phases of the Moon
This online form guides children in writing a poem about the phases of the Moon. Appropriate for ages 8 and up.

Fourmilab Switzerland
An interactive site created by John Walker that allows you to view the Moon from Earth, our Sun and the night side. It also gives descriptions and details of lunar formations. This site is suitable ages 10 and up.

Day and Night

SkyTellers: Day and Night
After listening to the SkyTellers Native American story "Ant Dances for Light" and the accompanying science story, children can continue to explore the cycle of day and night on Earth and other planets with the activities found here. The DVD and resource guide may be purchased through the SkyTellers website. Stories appropriate for ages 5 and up; resources geared toward facilitator.

SkyTellers: Constellations
The children may be inspired to look beyond the Moon and discover more about the constellations that appear at night. Direct them to hear Why Coyote Howls: A Star Story and the accompanying science story; this chapter of the DVD and accompanying activities are available to view for free on the SkyTellers website. Stories appropriate for ages 5 and up; resources geared toward facilitator.

Seasons

SkyTellers: Seasons
After listening to the SkyTellers Native American story "Spring Defeats Winter" and the accompanying science story, children can continue to explore seasons on Earth and other planets with the activities found here. The DVD and resource guide may be purchased through the SkyTellers website. Stories appropriate for ages 5 and up; resources geared toward facilitator.

SkyTellers: Polaris
Discussions about Earth's tilted axis and how it points to Polaris may inspire further investigation. The SkyTellers Native American tale of "Why the North Star Stands Still" supports investigations about Earth’s seasons. The DVD and resource guide may be purchased through the SkyTellers website. Stories appropriate for ages 5 and up; resources geared toward facilitator.

SciJinks "Why Does Earth Have Seasons"
This collaborative website highlights the research and missions of partners such as NASA and NOAA for youth. Find videos, images, games, materials to print, lesson plans, and articles about weather, the seasons, tides, and related topics. Appropriate for ages 10 and up.

Tides

National Ocean Service (NOS)
Children ages 11 and older may dive deeper into tides with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Ocean Service (NOS) education resources. Clear explanations of tides are available with supporting animations and a podcast.

SciJinks "Tides and Oceans"
This collaborative website highlights the research and missions of partners such as NASA and NOAA for youth. Find videos, images, games, materials to print, lesson plans, and articles about weather, the seasons, tides, and related topics. Appropriate for ages 10 and up.

Urban Legends about the Moon

Mythbusters Results, Mythbusters Episode 104: NASA Moon Landing
Appropriate for ages 12 and up, the facilitator, and parents.

May 8, 2010 365 Days of Astronomy pocast: "How Lunar Cycles Affect Wildlife"
A naturalist, a science educator, and a conservation biologist discuss the affect of the full Moon on wildlife. Appropriate for the facilitator and parents.

The Skeptics Dictionary, "Full Moon and Lunar Effects"
Appropriate for the facilitator and parents.

Phil Plait's Bad Astronomy: Yes, We Really Did Go to the Moon!
Appropriate for the facilitator and parents.

NASA's The Great Moon Hoax
Appropriate for the facilitator and parents.

 

Last updated
May 4, 2011

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