Lunar and Planetary Institute






Erosion

In Texas, teachers are expected to teach the process of erosion, its effects, and the resulting land forms.

3.6 B The student is expected to identify that the surface of the Earth can be changed by forces such as earthquakes and glaciers
4.10 A The student is expected to identify and observe effects of events that require time for changes to be noticeable, including growth, erosion, dissolving, weathering, and flow
5.11 A The student is expected to identify and observe actions that require time for changes to be measurable, including growth, erosion, dissolving, weathering, and flow
5.12 A The student is expected to interpret how land forms are the result of a combination of constructive and destructive forces such as deposition of sediment and weathering
6.6 C The student is expected to identify forces that shape features of the Earth including uplifting, movement of water, and volcanic activity
7.14 B The student is expected to analyze effects of regional erosional deposition and weathering
8.14 A The student is expected to predict land features resulting from gradual changes such as mountain building, beach erosion, land subsidence, and continental drift

The concept of erosion can be taught in conjunction with planetary characteristics, by comparing erosion on Earth with erosion on Mars.

Preliminary Concepts
Before they can understand erosion, students must first learn about wind and water.

Misconceptions and Educational Research

Activities about Erosion

Content Resources for the Pre-Service Educator

Potential Questions or Issues