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Planetary Data in Education Community

 

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Planetary Data in Learning Environments
A Community Workshop
Monday, August 1, 2005

Group Discussions - Group C

How can Planetary Science communicate its classroom relevancy in a standards based world?

Each group should designate a facilitator and a scribe.

The scribe will document the group discussion (computer, notepad); notes will be given to the program organizers.

The facilitator will report out to the workshop participants at the close of the group discussion. Please refer to the “Group Report-Out Questions”

Possible guiding questions:

  • How do/should planetary data and programs/products map to education standards or concepts taught?
  • In what format would the data and visualization mechanisms be most helpful and effective as learning tools?
  • What does student involvement look like?
  • Where do the results go?
  • What exemplary programs exist?
  • What research exists / is needed with respect to this topic?

Group Report-Out Questions (facilitator)

  • What were the major findings/discussion points?
  • What needs were identified?/What additional information is needed from this community group?
  • What are the priorities?
  • How can the PDE Initiative assist? How will this community group interact with the PDE?
  • What are the next steps to address the needs and priorities?

Group C Discussion

Summary – How can Planetary Science communicate its classroom relevancy in a standards based world?

  1. Define key planetary sci themes that cut across missions
  2. Map themes to standards (content and process) including physics, biology, chemistry, geography, math, literacy
  3. ID data resources for covering specific standards
  4. Work with the Earth Sci Revolution to promote policy change at the national, state, local level
  5. Create case studies of exemplary planetary science ed programs at a variety of grade levels. Demonstrate how planetary data can be used successfully without compromising need to teach to the standards.
  6. Deliver planetary data that is numerical, not just flat images. However, analysis tools need to be developed that are appropriate for the educational context (not for the scientists).
  7. Educators need standardized access point and interfaces -- classroom communities do not have time to find data and learn new interfaces for every dataset.

What are the points of intersection between use of planetary data and education standards?

Pick up on idea that what teachers start with the standards and figure out how planetary data can support.

The standards don't mandate teaching about Mars

Must be interdisciplinary, especially in lower grades.

A current strategy teach Earth and Space Science as an application of science, literacy, technology, and mathematics standards.

Write science for all Americans goals for each theme that is going to be taught. Instead of starting with the data you have, Ask “What would you want ALL Americans to know about planets?”

How do we integrate these data into what teachers are already teaching?How can we convince them that it's a great vehicle for meeting their educational goals.

Example

What are the requirements for life? What does that mean about maintaining Earth as a place

NASA data make great Engagement and Extension activities

Example

Mars Volcanoes as hook, Meat is in Earth Science, at end, go back from Earth to what we see on other planets. If you've learned it well enough on Earth, you can apply it anyplace else.

Check out Earth Science led by Bob Gabrys in Anne Arundel Schools

Work within the system: States have standards for Earth Science

Developers can push to get stuff into their own states.

Texas has recently started requiring 4 years of science, opening the way for more folks to take GMO (Geology, Meteorology, and Oceanography)

One interesting statistic showed number of jobs directly related to Earth increasing and number of students coming into college who woul even consider Earth Science courses.

Use NASA's driving questions.

Set-up and detailed assessment often suffer most in everyday teaching.

Process, technology, and inquiry skills can be taught with planetary data.

Concern was expressed about if we only think of using NASA for the hook and the assessment, might we get left out?

When students have ownership of data, they are more invested.

What about writing a bank of questions for high-stakes tests that utilize planetary data, giving them a stamp of approval from [the biggest, most credible organization we could get] and submit them to companies who write those tests.

Google Maps strategy could be used for Google Mars, Google Moon, etc.

What about serving numerical data in Web based clients? Visual data analysis isn't quite as rich as GIS-type queries etc.

Conversation about how much data students need to be able to get to — Caveat that tool builders want to add more capabilities than can be absorbed by many learners.

In order for students to meet standards, it is important to deliver planetary data that is numerical, not just flat images. However, analysis tools need to be developed for the educational context (not for the scientists).

Two types of analysis tools: GIS & image processing. Needs standardized access point and interfaces — classroom communities do not have time to learn new interfaces for every dataset.

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