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Planetary Data in Education Community

 

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Planetary Data in Learning Environments
A Community Workshop
Monday, August 1, 2005

Participant Interests and Expertise

Jackie Allen

Areas of Interest

  • Use of astromaterials data for formal education - chemistry, geology, etc.
  • Use of planetary surface images for planetary comparisons and for exploration themes
  • Research data in a variety of fields to share with formal and informal audiences

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • Classroom experience with how students approach and use data
  • Workshop design and presentation of data and data use

Topics for Further Exploration

  • How we (educators, EP/O professionals, students) get easy access to data
  • What data use programs are available that we could highlight in trainings

Overview of Programs

  • Workshops for formal and informal educators – Exploring the Solar System and Mars. We share some data-use activities with educators and we model some data-taking activities.
  • We are developing astromaterials classroom activities that use data

Shari Asplund

I want to learn more so I can potentially be a resource to the Discovery and New Frontiers missions and see if there is something I can do at the program office level.

I would like to know what models have been successful? How easy is it to access and use the data for educational purposes? What is needed?

I'm not directly involved with any programs hat bring planetary data into the formal/ informal educational setting, but some of the missions, such as Dawn, have plans to.

LuAnn Dahlman

I'm interested in generating professional development modules for educators that give them a successful experience in using planetary data and analysis tools... Unless teachers attain some minimal comfort level with obtaining and using planetary data, they will not introduce it to their students.

As part of the DLESE Data Services team, I've learned about a wide range of issues and obstacles to data use as well as some strategies for overcoming them.

I can demonstrate the Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET) as one strategy for encouraging data use among teachers and students.

I can share a recently developed EET chapter that utilizes planetary data and an online mapping tool called Jules Verne Voyager. The chapter is titled Creating Custom Map Images of Earth and Other Worlds.

Topics that I would like to explore further include:

  • What content topics that planetary data might address are in the highest demand by educators?
  • What planetary datasets provide the richest opportunities for student exploration?
  • Which data analysis tools are viewed as useable/useful by students at different grade levels?

The Earth Exploration Toolbook is a collection of computer-based Earth system science activities. Each activity, or chapter, introduces one or more data sets and an analysis tool that enables users to explore some aspect of the Earth system. Step-by-step instructions in each chapter walk users through an example — a case study in which they access data and use analysis tools to explore issues or concepts in Earth system science. In the course of completing a chapter, users produce and analyze maps, graphs, images, or other data products.

EET staff run monthly telecon-online workshops for educators to walk them through one of the chapters. Educators are responding very positively to these opportunities to get professional development in the comfort of their own locations on their own computers.

The EET project is looking for partnerships that would result in new chapters that utilize planetary data. We can facilitate development of new chapters and workshops by working with data providers, analysis tool developers, scientists, curriculum developers, and/or educators to build new chapters in the EET template.

Doris Daou

I am the E/PO lead for an astrobiology mission that will produce a rich archive of data. So I would like to see examples of using planetary data in education in order to get more ideas for our E/PO program.

I am an astronomer with E/PO expertise.

I would like to learn more about What the big issues, needs, and road blocks are.

Meredith Higbie

Areas of Interest

  • Possible future data tool creator

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • First hand experience with the difficulties in accessing and working with NASA data
  • Have been modestly involved in critiquing data tools
  • Familiar with the Earth System Community's efforts with data in the classroom

Topics for Further Exploration

  • What tools are currently available? Are there better ones in the making?
  • Making connections within the community to leverage expertise/experiences

Overview of Programs

  • Assisting in the development of the Planetary Data Community!!!

Frank Ireton

Areas of Interest

  • Applications in Earth systems K–12 classrooms as long-term — semester or school year projects.
  • Demonstrate to teachers and students the application of data in research.

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • I work with the National Earth Science Teachers Association to develop sessions at professional meetings
  • Work with professional societies — AGU, GSA, NAGT — to bring current research topics to classrooms and to teacher workshops
  • Involved with the Coalition for Earth Science Education to bring together members of the Earth/Space science EPO community to improve science teaching.
  • Broker partnerships and facilitate collaborative projects among professional associations and teachers
  • Curriculum materials development and workshops to demonstrate the products to users.

Topics for Further Exploration

  • Using data sets and imagery to involve students in real time research projects.
  • Involving students and teachers with researchers in projects.

Sheri Klug

Areas of Interest

  • I am interested in bridging current Mars data to classroom use in a teacher-friendly, student-engaging way.

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • The Mars Student Imaging Project, Mars Exploration Student Data Teams, Athena Student Intern Program.

Topics for Further Exploration

  • Evaluation methodology.

Overview of Programs

The Mars Student Imaging Project, Mars Exploration Student Data Teams, Athena Student Intern Program.

Steve McDonald

My goal is to make it possible for students to analyze geological features and processes on Mars and other planets. My approach is to develop engaging software to visualize planetary data so people can explore other planets.

For several years I have been developing GeoVirgil, a software product that integrates and visualizes a variety of planetary data. GeoVirgil is sort of like “Google Earth” for Mars. It combines imagery, elevation and a variety sensor data sets to create a virtual world. The user can fly over the Martian globe with a joystick or the map tools to analyze the same high resolution data scientists use.

I hope to learn more about the needs of the classroom teacher and the informal education community. What scientific concepts are you trying to convey? What NASA data sets support you instructional goals? What technology is available to your students? What supporting educational material do you need?

Jami Montgomery

Areas of Interest

  • Developing software tools to interface with NASA planetary data archives.

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • Preliminary efforts in developing a software framework that provides a GUI interface to NASA Topographical data. The GUI allows visualization and tools for graphical scientific analyses.

Topics for Further Exploration

  • What others in the community are doing in developing software tools to access and use of planetary data.
  • Any programs/resources available to aid in developing interfaces to NASA planetary data

Overview of Programs

  • DePaul Space Science Center and School of Computer Science Telecommunication and Information Systems, DePaul University, Chicago IL

Steve Moore

We recently received a grant from the NASA Explorer Schools program to provide instructional materials and professional development on how to use digital image analysis (DIA) and geographic information systems (GIS) as tools for inquiry-based learning. Our plan is to put together materials and workshop experiences that help teachers understand how DIA and GIS will be integral parts of NASA's new vision for space exploration.

Areas of Expertise and Experience include:

  • How to introduce DIA and GIS to teachers in instructional materials and in professional development workshops.
  • How to sustain implementation of the two technologies
  • How to construct online tools for DIA explorations.

I would like to know more about what NASA data portals are most easily accessible by educators. Which portals have the best data for educators to use? Are there any rich data resources that are currently being neglected by educators but could be used if help on how to use the materials was provided?

We're using planetary data in the following ongoing and recently completed programs:

  1. Visual Instruction Support for Inquiry-based Odysseys in the NASA Explorer Schools (VISIONES) will provide professional development opportunities for teachers participating in the NASA Explorer Schools (NES) program. Over a two year period, VISIONES will provide e-learning and face-to-face professional development opportunities for NES teachers to learn how to use two advanced visualization technologies — digital image processing and analysis (IPA) and geographic information systems (GIS) — as tools for classroom exploration of NASA remote sensing, space exploration, and other data products. The purpose of the explorations will be to promote the use of visualization tools for standards-based education of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) concepts in the NES.
  2. Ocean Explorers. Ocean Explorers is a three-year effort funded by the Information Technology Experiences for Students and Teachers program of the National Science Foundation. The project is helping one cohort of 70 middle and high school teachers use DIA and GIS to teach ocean science to middle and high school students. We've taught the teachers to use remotely sensed data from NASA and NOAA satellites (e.g., sea surface temperatures, ocean color data, and Landsat) in their GIS projects.
  3. SIMPLE Science. The Simplified Image Management and Processing Learning Environment for Science (SIMPLE Science) project is funded by the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) program. For SIMPLE, CIPE is developing lessons that feature the use of a Web-based DIA program — WebImage — that is embedded in discovery-based science, mathematics, and social studies lessons. Lessons that use NASA planetary data are in progress.

Dan Neafus

My primary interest in planetary data is for the creation of content for digital planetariums.

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • Our recent experience in digital planetarium production and software development.
  • Informal education techniques utilizing Immersive Virtual Reality environments like the digital planetarium

Topics for Further Exploration

  • What resources are available?
  • What formats are available?
  • What tools are utilized for manipulating the data?
  • What collaborative opportunities might be developed between those most familiar with the data and those of us involved in creating widely distributed content.

Overview of Programs

  • Public Planetarium programs such as "A Cosmic Journey" that utilizes planetary textures.
  • Informal Education lectures that utilize real-time display of many types of data, including planetary surfaces.

Jessica Robin

Areas of Interest

  • Integrating GLOBE data with remotely sensed data
  • Integrating math and science curriculum

I work closely with educators and students teaching them how to use Basic GAPS, a computer simulation model of the Earth system developed specifically for students by the GLOBE Soil Characterization Team. Basic GAPS is a computer model for students that can simulate the cycle of water between the atmosphere, soil, and plant.  Students can easily obtain the required soil, vegetation, phenology, and climate data from sources such as the GLOBE program data archive and input the information through guided menus.  A major goal of the Basic GAPS model is to teach students that the Earth's environments are the result of dynamic interactions among many processes and many components including the water cycle. 

Topics for Further Exploration

  • How to address spatial data in K-12 education
  • How to integrate math and science curriculum

Don Robinson-Boonstra

Areas of Interest

  • Inclusion of data into new Student Observation network module, “Search for Life in the Solar System”

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • Many years of experience in incorporating NASA data into classrooms using thematic organization.

Topics for Further Exploration

  • I am a sponge – I want to see what is available, what can be incorporated that has already been developed, etc

Jodi Schoemer

Areas of Interest

I am interested in opportunities to get data (and as available, various software for data preparation and/or display) for planetarium, exhibit, multimedia, and lecture/presentation opportunities.

The Denver Museum of Natural Science, through its Space Odyssey exhibit, has participated in data re space (missions, Mars, Earth) via short-turn-around media displays and facilitation opportunities. We also have self-developed a digital planetarium system for media display.

Topics for Further Exploration

  • Opportunities for collaboration
  • Funding opportunities
  • Ways to “make sense” of all the data that is out there to help figure out which are appropriate sources for which venues/types of informal education

Overview of Programs

1) Space Odyssey – 13,000 sq ft exhibit that opened in 2003. It is the most popular exhibit in the museum, and includes (1) 12X10 high resolution display with corresponding media-based interpretation and trained facilitator interpretation. There is a monthly “space today” news stage show and weekly updates on a separate mission board. It uses intranet-delivered media via a wireless laptop for facilitation on the floor.

2) “Sphere of Life” (working title) – an all digital, high-resolution planetarium show being planned for 2007. The focus is anticipated to be Earth-systems science, and it will incorporate real data into visualization models.

3) “Hall of Earth” (working title) – 12,000 sq foot permanent exhibit tentatively planned for the museum. The exhibit is anticipated to focus on Earth systems, geology, etc. It will present current science in context; we are interested in means and ways to pull current science into the program.

4) Cosmic Atlas – self-developed 3-D digital real-time display system for our Gates Planetarium. The display incorporates planetary data into the models. We are interested in adding to our system, and in exploring collaborative projects.

Stephanie Shipp

My primary interest is in developing activities that use Earth and space science data in an authentic manner in the formal educational environment. I also want to explore the integration of data into activities in the after-school setting.

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • Experience in use of Earth science data.
  • Facilitation of partnerships between researchers and educators.
  • Development of Earth and space science classroom materials
  • Facilitation of educator learning in Earth and space science content, pedagogy, and resources

Topics for Further Exploration

  • What elements truly engage children/students in learning about Earth and space science through the use of data in activities, interactive Web explorations, etc. What elements encourage them to continue their exploration?
  • How do we get the collection/manipulation/interpretation of authentic data in education to become “second nature” (where it makes sense) — especially with respect to process skills?
  • How can this Planetary Data initiative support the community of individuals interested in bringing planetary data into educational venues (e.g., forming partnerships, gaining access to data, etc.).
  • In a strategic sense, what directions should the Initiative go, grow, and develop?

Overview of Programs

  • Mars mission instrument — we will be designing and developing an interactive Web site at which children will learn about and manipulate data collected with the instrument (future).
  • We have interest in partnering to develop a program that allows comparisons of Jupiter's moons.
  • We are working to integrate data into our activities and workshops. At this stage most of our activities use visual observations of imagery (e.g., observing and analyzing features on the Mars MOLA map, using planetary globes and maps to introduce planetary processes).

Mike Slootmaker

Areas of Interest

  • Upper elementary through high school

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • 37 years of experience in public education (27 as a classroom teacher and 10 as a system dynamics mentor)
  • 12 years experience using image processing software (Image J, NIH Image, Scion Image) with students and teachers
  • certified Center for Image Processing instructor

Topics for Further Exploration

  • Where can I get DEMs of the moon, Mars, and planets (I'm particularly interested in DEMS of areas where the Martian rovers have traveled)?
  • Where can I get topo maps of the moon, Mars, and other planets?
  • How do I determine the distance in meters or km that Martian dust devils, which are displayed in NASA videos, travel?
  • Where can I get images of the Antarctic icecap over time (specifically 1995 through present)?
  • Where can I get images of earth glaciers showing change over time (specifically 1995 through present)?
  • Where can I get images of Jupiter showing atmospheric change over a period of 24 to 48 hours?
  • Where can I get images showing changing surface features of the moons of Jupiter and Saturn over time?

Overview of Programs

I'm working for the Center for Image Processing in Education. CIPE develops instructional materials and conducts workshops that use digital image analysis and geographic information systems technologies as platforms for teaching about science, mathematics and technology.

Anita Sohus

Areas of Interest

  • Museum Alliance: using data in educational activities/programs not just in shows

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • Feedback from Museum Alliance partners on formats, etc.

Topics for Further Exploration

  • How is/can planetary data be used in actual inquiry based activities/programs

Overview of Programs

  • Museum Alliance: community of practice of self-selected staff at museums, science centers, and planetaria that have a strong interest in and capability in presenting space and earth science to the public, students, and teachers.

Emerson Speyerer

Areas of Interest

  • Web-based data distribution
  • Planetary data in planetariums and exhibits
  • Planetary data in the classroom

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • Worked on several image database systems including:
    • Near-Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR)
    • Mariner 10
  • Have the perspective of both a student and as researcher

Topics for Further Exploration

  • How can you test the effectiveness of current projects in the classroom, on the web, and museum exhibits?
  • What type of tools do the educators want to see in the classroom?

Overview of Programs

I've worked on a web-based image archive and planetarium exhibit for the NEAR mission. I've also developed a field geology guide to asteroids as well as 100 orbital movies of 433 Eros. In addition I've worked on an image archive of Mercury from all the images acquired by Mariner 10.

Adam Tarnoff

I am interested in bringing GIS-based planetary data into K–12 classroom environments to augment existing curricular materials on Earth structures and processes.

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • Use of data visualization and analysis tools to support inquiry-based pedagogy.
  • Integration of educational research and k-12 product design / development.
  • Use of technology to foster the integration of curriculum, instruction, and assessment in both formal and informal learning contexts.

Topics for Further Exploration

  • How is planetary data typically used in K–12 classroom around the country?
  • What vision does this community have for the ideal use of planetary data in formal learning contexts?
  • Which national or state standards are best addressed by the products this community has to offer?

Overview of Programs

Northwestern University's Geographic Data in Education (GEODE) Initiative is dedicated to the improvement of Earth and environmental science education through the use of data visualization and analysis tools to support inquiry-based pedagogy. Through an integrated program of research and development, the GEODE Initiative is advancing our understanding of learning in the Earth and environmental sciences, design of curriculum and educational software, and teacher professional development. Equally important, the GEODE Initiative is creating useful and useable products for students and teachers at levels ranging from middle school through college.

Kay Tobola

Areas of Interest

  • Integrating data to make classroom activities more authentic.
  • Learning the possibilities for use of the data.

Areas of Expertise and Experience

  • Lesson design, classroom instruction, curriculum development

Topics for Further Exploration

  • I don't know enough about the use of planetary data as an educational tool to answer; that is what I would like to learn here.

Overview of Programs

  • Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets, a high school education package, has the most authentic data that we have attempted to incorporate into a curriculum design. Learners interpret data from our labs as the story of initially recognizing Martian meteorites is told.

 

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