Lunar and Planetary Institute






Lunar Science and Exploration
Center for Lunar Science and Exploration

Training

Field Training and Research Program

The CLSE has created a field training and research program.  It was designed to meet at Meteor Crater every other year for program continuity and at alternate sites during intervening years for program diversity.  Due to logistical constraints, that alternating schedule was not implemented in the first four years of the program.  It is, however, planned for future years.

2010   Field Training and Research Program at Meteor Crater Check mark
2011   Field Training and Research Program at Meteor Crater Check mark
2012   Short Course and Field School at the Sudbury Impact Structure Check mark
2013   Short Course and Field School at the Sudbury Impact Structure Check mark
2014   Field Training and Research Program at Meteor Crater Check markSpacer
2015   (Tentative) Field Training and Research Program at Zuni-Bandera Volcanic Field Spacer
2016   (Tentative) Field Training and Research Program at Meteor Crater Spacer
2017   (Tentative) Short Course and Field School at the Sudbury Impact Structure   Spacer        

Field Training and Research Program at Meteor Crater

The Field Training and Research Program at Meteor Crater is a week long field class and research project based at Barringer Meteorite Crater, Arizona, more popularly known as Meteor Crater. The goal of the field camp is to introduce students to impact cratering processes and provide an opportunity to assist with a research project at the crater. Skills developed during field camp should better prepare students for their own thesis studies in impact cratered terrains, whether they be on the Earth, the Moon, Mars, or some other solar system planetary surface. This field camp was originally organized under the auspices of the NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI), which was designed, in part, to train a new generation of explorers for the Moon and beyond. Thus far, the program has been held in 2010 and 2011. The next session is anticipated for the fall of 2014.

Short Course and Field School at the Sudbury Impact Structure

Short Course and Field School at the Sudbury Impact Structure is a week-long program of field and classroom activities. The goal of the field camp is to introduce students to impact cratering processes associated with an immense basin-size impact event and differentiated melt sheet. Skills developed during the field camp should better prepare students for their own thesis studies in impact cratered terrains, whether they be on the Earth, the Moon, Mars, or some other solar system planetary surface.This field camp was originally organized with our Canadian partners under the auspices of the NASA Lunar Science Institute, which was designed, in part, to train a new generation of explorers for the Moon and beyond.

Higher Education

The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration, in collaboration with numerous Texas higher education institutions, has initiated the Higher Education Lunar Consortium. Science faculty and Center researchers are working together to infuse lunar science and exploration content into undergraduate and graduate courses. The consortium provides students access to the latest exploration results and opportunities for research and careers in cutting-edge lunar science.

Members

Higher Education Lunar Consortium Resources New

Locations

Lunar Exploration Summer Intern Program & Exploration Science Summer Intern Program

We also host an intern program at the LPI that provides students an opportunity to be involved in exploration activities. Teams of  interns are organized to determine which locations on the Moon will be the best landing sites to meet science requirements. Additional details of the program are posted at the Lunar Exploration Summer Intern Program website. This six year (2008–2013) program has been superseded by the Exploration Science Summer Intern Program.

Beginning in 2015, the LPI is hosting a new program that builds on the success of the Lunar Exploration Summer Intern Program, which was designed to evaluate possible landing sites on the Moon for robotic and human exploration missions.  The program for 2015 will have the same impact on future exploration activities, but will have a broader scope that includes both the Moon and near-Earth asteroids.  It is a unique opportunity for students to integrate scientific input with exploration activities in a way that mission architects and spacecraft engineers can use.  Activities may involve assessments and traverse plans for a particular destination (e.g., on the lunar farside) or a more general assessment of a class of possible exploration targets (e.g., small near-Earth asteroids). Additional details of the program are posted at the Exploration Science Summer Intern Program website.

Postdoctoral Fellows

Postdoctoral

Senior Scientists will seek post-doctoral fellows to support the research initiatives outlined above. These positions will be advertised through the LPI and on the Center’s website for Opportunities.

In the image shown here, a LPI Postdoctoral Fellow is working in the Apollo sample curatorial facility at the Johnson Space Center.

Training in Lunar and Planetary Analogue Terrains

To better integrate science and exploration in the nation’s plans for future missions, the Center for Lunar Science and Exploration also fosters opportunities for its student and postdoctoral team members to study analogue terrains.   Thus far, the program has facilitated two analogue terrain events:

  • Geophysical Survey of Barringer Meteorite Crater, aka Meteor Crater, Arizona (May 2010) – This activity engaged graduate students from the University of Houston and the University of Texas-Austin.
  • Field Assessment of Impact Ejecta around the Ries Crater, Germany (June 2010) – This activity engaged three postdoctoral researchers in the NASA Lunar Science Institute
  • Lunar Analogue Training at Meteor Crater, Arizona & the San Francisco Volcanic Field, Arizona (April–May 2011) –  This activity engaged nine postdoctoral researchers from LPI and JSC; three graduate students from the University of Maryland, University of Houston, and Rice University; and an education specialist from LPI.
  • Field Assessment of the Anorthosite-rich Stillwater Igneous Complex, Montana (July 2012) – This activity engaged three postdoctoral researchers in the NASA Lunar Science Institute and gave them an opportunity to see a classic analogue for the lunar magma ocean and planetary differentiation.
  • Field Assessment of Impact Ejecta at Barringer Meteorite Crater, aka Meteor Crater, Arizona (January 2013) – This activity was integrated with the excavation of impact ejecta that was being made to accommodate a reconfiguration of the Visitor Center at the crater.  It involved four postdoctoral researchers in the NASA Lunar Science Institute.

In addition, participants in the Lunar Exploration Summer Intern Program are briefed several times about NASA’s formal Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATS) that are a key component of NASA’s planetary exploration analogue program. All of these activities are designed to compliment and expand the training opportunities available through the formal Field Training and Research Program at Meteor Crater, which is described in greater detail above.



Kepler crater

Lunar Science and Exploration Information Portal

SSERVI Central (at NASA Ames)

Other SSERVI Teams
   Ames Research Center
   Applied Physics Laboratory
   Brown University - MIT
   Goddard Space Flight Center
   Southwest Research Institute
   Stony Brook University
   University of Central Florida
   University of Colorado

International SSERVI Partners
   Canada
   Germany
   Israel
   Italy
   Korea
   Netherlands
   Saudi Arabia
   United Kingdom

Previous NLSI Member Teams
   Applied Physics Laboratory
   Brown University
   Goddard Space Flight Center
   Southwest Research Institute
   University of Colorado (a)
   University of Colorado (b)

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