Monthly Archives: October 2012

Sy Libergot: Apollo 13, The Longest Hour

Hear what it was like to be a front-line Flight Controller in NASA’s Mission Control when a monster failure occurred during the Apollo 13 mission to the moon. Sy Liebergot will share his reactions, NASA footage, and details of the explosion and the heroic efforts to bring the crew back safely to Earth. He’ll also discuss the Apollo 13 movie’s accuracy and how he met Tom Hanks and Ron Howard.

This talk is free and open to the public. It will be held on Tuesday, November 13 at 7 pm in the Science & Engineering Classroom (SERC), Room 100 in Building 529 on the University of Houston main campus. Additional information can be found online.

Wheels and Reels: Two Science Competitions

Two science competitions for students are going on now:

RASC-AL Lunar Wheel Design Competition

The RASC-AL (Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts-Academic Linkage) Lunar Wheel Design Competition is open to full-time undergraduate or graduate students majoring in Science, Technology, Engineering, or Math at an accredited US-based university. Foreign students or universities can participate as members of a U.S.-led Team. A group of universities may also work in collaboration on a design project entry. The deadline for project plan submission is December 16, 2012.

NASA’s REEL Science Communication Contest

Interested in creating a science video? Are you between 13 and 18 years old? Are you a resident of the US? If so, this may be the contest for you. High school-age students are invited to produce a video communicating Earth Science to younger students. Winners will have their videos posted on NASA’s website and will get the opportunity to be a NASA producer working with NASA scientists and communication experts in July 2013 to produce an Earth Science feature video. Consider submitting a two-minute video to the NASA’s REEL Science Communication Contest by February 15, 2013.

The Boldest Mission to Mars Ever

Rice University’s public Space Frontiers Lectures series is designed to introduce Rice University students and the general public to the wide array of issues involved in the pursuit of an advanced presence in space. The next presentation in the series will be given by two members of the Mars Science Laboratory team from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Join Bobak Ferdowsi (“Mohawk Guy”) and Ravi Prakash as they take you through the events in the wee hours of August 6 that led to Curiosity’s extraordinary landing on Mars, and find out what the rover has been doing ever since. This free event will be held on November 1 at 7 pm in Duncan Hall, McMurtry Auditorium at Rice University. More information about this event can be found online.

Naming the New NASA Science and Exploration Institute

The NASA Lunar Science Institute (NLSI) is in the process of expanding to include other destinations beyond the Moon, stemming from NASA’s Flexible Path strategy for human exploration. The new Institute’s scope will include science and exploration research efforts focusing on solar system destinations for human exploration.

NASA is seeking input from the broad community for a name for the new Institute, reflective of its broader scope. The name (or acronym, if appropriate) should be brief, easily recognizable and include NASA as part of the name. The name should not have a trademark or copyright. Additionally, it should not have any significant similarity in spelling or sound to an existing product or organization name, such that it would cause confusion.

Official rules are listed and suggestions can be submitted online. Suggestions for the new name of the NASA Lunar Science Institute must be submitted no later than midnight PST November 9, 2012. Announcement of the new Institute name is anticipated in early 2013.

LPSC 44

It’s official–the 44th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (LPSC) will take place March 18 – 22, 2013 at the Woodlands Waterway Hotel and Convention Center. The abstract deadline is January 8, 2012. More formal announcements and other details will be posted soon on the  LPSC meeting website.

New from the NASA History Office

The NASA History Office has a new selection of e-books available:

In Pursuit of Power: NASA’s Propulsion Systems Laboratory No. 1 and 2. (NASA SP-2012-4548), Monograph in Aerospace History number 48, by Robert Arrighi.

NASA Historical Data Book, Vol. VIII: NASA Earth Science and Space Applications, Aeronautics, Technology, and Exploration, Tracking and Data Acquisition/Space Operations, Facilities and Resources 1989–1998.
(NASA SP-2012-4012) compiled by Judy Rumerman. Available online only.

NASA Historical Data Book, Vol. VIII: NASA Earth Science and Space Applications, Aeronautics, Technology, and Exploration, Tracking and Data Acquisition/Space Operations, Facilities and Resources 1989–1998. Tables.
(NASA SP-2012-4012) compiled by Judy Rumerman. Available online only.

Aeronautics and Astronautics: A Chronology: 2008 (NASA SP-2012-4034) compiled by Marieke Lewis. Available online only.

Aeronautics and Astronautics: A Chronology: 2009 (NASA SP-2012-4035) compiled by Marieke Lewis. Available online only.

National Geologic Map Database

The National Geologic Map Database (NGMD) is a collaborative effort primarily involving the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) to develop “a distributed archive of standardized geoscience information for the nation.” The NGMD website has links to a map catalog, geologic names, a map interface, and information about geologic mapping projects in progress. (Please note that some parts of this database are still under construction and may not be currently available.)