AGU SESSION P3480 – SURFACE BOUNDARY EXOSPHERES: COMPARING THE MOON, MERCURY, AND MUCH MORE

Surface boundary exospheres are thin collisionless planetary atmospheres in which gas and dust constituents only collide with the surface.  This class of atmosphere may be the most common among solar system objects. Mercury, the Moon, several outer planets moons, and Saturn’s rings are known to host such atmospheres, and it is likely that other moons and the larger asteroids do also, including trojans and centaurs. These bodies should also host tenuous shrouds of dust, whether from actively vented plume materials or ejecta from ongoing micrometeoroid bombardment of the surfaces and ring systems of such bodies. The purpose of this session is to report results from recent missions, including MESSENGER at Mercury, LADEE and LRO at the Moon, Cassini at Saturn/Enceladus, Hubble and Galileo at Europa and Io, and Earth-based occultations of Chariklo. Comparison of observations with modeling results of source, transport and loss processes are very welcome.

Abstract submission, due 6 Aug 2014, can be found here:  http://fallmeeting.agu.org/2014/scientific-program/

Conveners:

R. Elphic (richard.c.elphic@nasa.gov)
K. Retherford (KRetherford@swri.edu)
M. Benna (mehdi.benna-1@nasa.gov)
J. Keller (john.w.keller@nasa.gov)

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