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32. Haemus Montes Io, Jupiter
32. Haemus Montes
Io, Jupiter

This 3-D Voyager 1 view features Haemus Montes, a prominent mountain near the south pole of Jupiter’s large satellite Io. Haemus Montes is about 150 kilometers across and consists of two sections. A broad plateau 4 kilometers high forms the eastern portion (to the left; north is down in this view). The western portion rises about 9 kilometers above the surrounding plains. The numerous parallel striations across Haemus Montes suggest that the mountain is intensely fractured or consists of layered volcanic deposits. The origin of the mountain is uncertain, but may be due to uplift of large blocks of crust along thrust faults. Mountains cover only a few percent of Io’s surface but indicate that Io's crust is probably composed mostly of silicates rather than sulfur compounds. Sulfur is too weak a geologic material and would not support mountains 9 kilometers high. The bright ring or aureole surrounding Haemus Montes is probably composed of sulfur dioxide frost, which may have been vented from aquifers of sulfur dioxide within Haemus Montes. The “natural” color of Io is a greenish yellow because of the presence of sulfur. The colors shown here are real but are enhanced.

Voyager 1 images 16392.00, 16393.01.
Location: 70.0 S, 45.0 W
Image Width: 270 kilometers
Vertical Exaggeration: 5.2× normal
Image Resolution: 430 meters/pixel

Right click here to download a high-resolution version of the image (344 KB)



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