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26. Uplifted Basalt Plateau, Somalia Coast

26. Uplifted Basalt Plateau, Somalia Coast

Prior to the opening of the Red Sea and the separation of Arabia and Africa, the site of the future ocean was marked by regional doming, rifting, and effusion of basaltic lavas. A thick pile of dissected basalt is visible in this photograph of the north coast of Somalia, which originally joined the south coast of Arabia. The lavas form a conspicuous, dark sequence with four or five topographic steps and their upper surface exhibits a prominent paleodrainage pattern. An unconformity separates the basalts from the underlying Precambrian basement gneisses.

The photograph also reveals the hot climate and harsh desert terrain of the Somali Republic. Nothing grows on the coastal strip where rain rarely falls. The land rises in steps to a highland plateau. At an elevation of 1500 meters (5000 feet) the climate is more pleasant than on the coast, but, at a latitude only 10 from the equator, the Sun is blisteringly hot and only scrub can survive.

STS-2 November 1981. Picture #2-10-642.

Right click here to download a high-resolution version of the image (8.76 MB)



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