Planet Tour Demo


The following images are for demonstration purposes only. None of the links within the images are active. Use the scrollbar on the right to browse through the demo. Active links are provided at the end of the demo to allow you to continue your tour.


After clicking on the Planet Tour button you will see the following page:

From this page you can view 3-D images of the planetary body of your choice by clicking on its name or icon. To return to the 3-D Tour of the Solar System home page, click on your browser's Back button.

If you click on Earth, the following page will appear:

Earth's 3-D images have been divided into five categories, represented by the five postcards labeled Rivers & Glaciers, Craters, Storms, Faults, and Volcanos. To browse the 3-D image collection for a particular category, you may click anywhere within that category's postcard.

The 3-D button in the lower-lefthand corner provides easy access to the 3-D Tour of the Solar System home page. A Moon image has been provided for access to the lunar 3-D image collection.

If you click on Volcanos, you will see the following page:

A brief introduction to Volcanos on Earth is followed by a list of the subcategories available for this section. You may click on a subcategory title to go directly to that part of the 3-D image collection, or you may manually scroll through the entire Volcanos section using the scrollbar found along the righthand side of your browser window.

The Home, Planet Tour, and Return to EARTH buttons provide a shortcut to these popular menu pages. Your browser's Back button may also be used to return to these menu pages, but may require many clicks.

Clicking on the Stratovolcanos subcategory title will take you to the following page:

For each 3-D image in the subcategory, the following is provided: a small thumbnail image, the site name, the general location, the planet or object name, and a brief listing of features that can be seen in the image. To get a better view of the 3-D image and more detailed information about the area, you may click on either the thumbnail image or the underlined site name.

If you click on Mount Fuji, the following page will appear:

The Description portion of this page provides history and feature information about the 3-D image and the surrounding area. Highlighted underlined text in this section provides links to other related 3-D images in the collection. You may view these related 3-D images by clicking on the highlighted underlined text. A scrollbar is provided if the 3-D image or description information will not fit into your page.

The Data Sheet section may be accessed by clicking on the highlighted words "DATA SHEET" or by manually scrolling down using the scrollbar along the righthand side of the Description section. Either of these actions will display the following page:

The Data Sheet section provides detailed image location, source, and acquisition information and is located immediately below the Description Section. A definition for each of the Data Sheet entries is included in the Glossary and may be accessed via the Glossary button described later.   NOTE:  Some Data Sheets may be longer than others depending on the availability of information.

Clicking on the highlighted word "Top" at the top of the Data Sheet will take you back to the top of the Description section.

Several other navigation and information aids are available:

      

The P button provides a shortcut to the Planet Tour page.

The G button provides a shortcut to the Geology Tour page.

The highlighted word "Earth" provides a shortcut back to the main Earth page.

A square white marker on the global reference map gives the approximate location of the 3-D image. The marker is for general location reference only and is not intended to represent the image coverage. For image coverage information, see the Regional View. (Note: For some planets and objects, only a partial global reference map is available because of the lack of complete global image coverage by missions at this time.)

A compass with a red North arrow shows the approximate geographic North orientation for the 3-D image.

The Home button takes you to the opening 3-D Tour of the Solar System home page.

The Glossary button takes you to the Glossary page. The Glossary contains an alphabetical list of definitions for terms used in the Description, Data Sheet, and Features of Interest sections. Alphabetic shortcuts are provided at the top of the page to allow you to quickly locate terms and their definitions. Use your browser's Back button to leave the Glossary and return to the 3-D image page. (This may take several clicks depending on how much browsing you have done in the Glossary.) The Glossary also contains shortcut buttons for returning you to the 3-D Tour of the Solar System, Planet Tour, and Geology Tour pages.

The Description button will display the Description and Data Sheet page described earlier.

The Features of Interest button will display the following page:

The Features of Interest page provides location and descriptive information about the various geologic and geographic features in the 3-D image. Feature locations are highlighted on the 3-D image by colored lines and text. Descriptions of the colored features may be found under the heading of the same color in the Features of Interest Text on the lefthand side of the page.  NOTE:  Although some features and headings are colored blue they do not serve as links.    Highlighted underlined text in this section provides links to other related 3-D images in the collection. You may view these related 3-D images by clicking on the highlighted underlined text. A scrollbar is provided if the 3-D image or description information will not fit into your page.   NOTE:  Not all images have a Features of Interest section. If this is the case for an image you are viewing, the Features of Interest button will be grayed out.

Clicking on the Regional View button will display the following page:

The Regional View page shows the location of the 3-D image with respect to surrounding large-scale geographic features. NOTE:    A Regional View is not available for all images. If this is the case for an image you are viewing, the Regional View button will be grayed out.

The Full-Sized View button will display the following page:

The Full-Sized View page allows you to view the 3-D image at full resolution. In most cases the Full-Sized View will be larger than the page and you will need to use the vertical and/or horizontal scrollbars, located along the righthand and/or bottom edges of your page, to view the entire 3-D image. There are a few instances where the Full-Sized View will be smaller than the view presented in the Description and Features of Interest pages. This is normal for small images and is due to the fact that the small image is automatically enlarged to fill the image section of the Description and Features of Interest pages. In these instances, the Full-Sized View accurately represents the full-resolution view of the 3-D image.

Some 3-D images are easier to view than others. If you are having difficulty viewing a particular image in 3-D, try varying your viewing distance by moving closer to or farther away from your computer screen. For some 3-D images it is useful to try to focus your eyes beyond the image rather than directly on the screen. This technique is particularly useful for viewing images of landscapes.

Remember that you can return to the previous page at any time by using your browser's Back button.

  This concludes the Planet Tour demonstration.

 


You may click on one of the following icons to leave the demonstration and continue your 3-D Tour of the Solar System:

 

     Return to the 3-D Tour of the Solar System home page

   Return to the Welcome Page

   Begin the Planet Tour