VERNADSKY INSTITUTE
BROWN UNIVERSITY
INTERNATIONAL UNION OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES

MICROSYMPOSIUM 27

WORKSHOP ON
VENUS  GEOLOGICAL MAPPING AND IMPLICATIONS

March 14-15, 1998
Just Prior to the 29th LPSC
Lunar and Planetary Institute
Houston, Texas, USA

The recent publication of overview chapters in the Venus II book and the Chapman conference on Venus Geodynamics have served to focus attention on the significant questions in the geological and geophysical evolution of Venus. At the same time, detailed geological mapping of the surface of Venus has been underway for the last several years in the form of analyses of specific areas and features and attempts to understand their stratigraphic context (e.g., tessera, coronae, steep-sided domes, etc.). Regional mapping in the 1:5M scale NASA program has served to focus on the geologic units and stratigraphic sequence in different parts of the planet. Together, these studies are beginning to reveal trends and correlations that are important to unraveling the geologic history of Venus, addressing outstanding questions, and identifying key questions and issues for further research. As a follow-on to earlier workshops on Venus (Tessera Terrain, Microsymposium 21; Venus Geological History, Microsymposium 23; Venus: Critical Issues in Geological Evolution, Microsymposium 25), the workshop this year will focus on presentation and discussion of the results of individual mapping efforts in different parts of Venus, and in the discussion of how these results relate to the geological evolution of Venus from a regional and global perspective.

This workshop is designed to bring together key workers on these questions and to present maps and results in an informal workshop mode of discussion and mutual understanding of observations and interpretations. The meeting is scheduled on the weekend just prior to the 29th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. Saturday afternoon (1:00 p.m.  - 6:00 p.m.) will be spent in poster and short oral (5-7 minute) presentations, and discussion sessions that will illustrate the results of geologic mapping at various scales and stratigraphic or thematic studies related to geological processes and history. On Sunday morning (9:00 a.m. - 12:00 noon) we will continue poster and short presentations and discussions, focusing the identification of key issues and outlining the research and tests that might be undertaken to address these problems. In the latter part of Sunday morning, several individuals will make informal presentations on their view of the most important issues and this will form the basis for a general group discussion. We will end the workshop with an open discussion on the key outstanding questions and information required for the further advancement in understanding the geological history of Venus. On Saturday evening (6:00 - 7:30 p.m.), prior to dinner, we will host an informal reception at the LPI.

We solicit your poster and short oral contributions for the Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning sessions. Posters that address the workshop theme and that will also be presented at the 29th LPSC are also welcomed, as the workshop format will give additional time for discussion.


Co-Organizers:
David Senske
Sterling Software/Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Mail Stop 264-580
4800 Oak Grove Drive
Pasadena CA 91109
Phone:   818-393-7775
E-mail:   dsenske@pop.jpl.nasa.gov

Alexander T. Basilevsky
Vernadsky Institute
contact address after February 7:
Brown University
Box 1846
Providence RI 02912
Phone:   401-863-1437
Fax:   401-863-3978
E-mail:   basilevsky@pggipl.geo.brown.edu

James W. Head
Brown University
Box 1846
Providence RI 02912
Phone:   401-863-2526
Fax:   401-863-3978
E-mail:   James_Head_III@Brown.edu

Meeting Coordinator:
Anne Cote
Brown University
Box 1846
Providence RI 02912
Phone:   401-863-2436
Fax:   401-863-3978
E-mail:   Anne_C_Cote@Brown.edu


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