©Meteoritical Society, 1996
The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 80, 1996 July

The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 80, 1996 July

A listing of recently characterized or discovered meteorites

by

Jeffrey N. GROSSMAN

U.S. Geological Survey, MS 954, Reston, Virginia 22092, USA
From Meteoritics and Planetary Science, Volume 31 (1996)
.

AbstractThe Meteoritical Bulletin No. 80 lists data for 178 meteorites. Noteworthy are 3 HED meteorites (ALH 88102, Hammadah al Hamra (HaH) 059, and Monticello); 3 ureilites (HaH 064, HaH 126, and Dar al Gani (DaG) 084); 4 irons (Baygorria (IAB), Ste. Croix (IIIAB), Sargiin Gobi (IAB), and Tarahumara (IIE)); an unusual metal-rich meteorite (Vermillion); 8 carbonaceous chondrites (HaH 043 (CO3), HaH 073 (C4), DaG 055 (C3) and 5 CO3 chondrites (probably paired) from DaG); an R chondrite (DaG 013); and 6 unequilibrated ordinary chondrites (ALH 88105 (L3), Camel Donga 016 (L3), HaH 093 (LL3.9), HaH 096 (LL(L)3), Richfield (LL3.7), and Sarir Quattusah (LL(L)3)). Three recent falls of ordinary chondrites (Coleman (LL5), St. Robert (H5), and Tsukuba (H5-6)) are described.


Allan Hills 88067-88118
76 deg.43'S, 159 deg. 20'E (approx.) These newly classified meteorites (Table 1) are curated by EUROMET at The Open University, U. K. Classification and analyses were done by J. Bridges, R. Hutchison, M. Grady, C. Li and I. Lunney, Natural History Museum, London, U. K. Sample requests: R. Hutchison, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD, U. K.

The howardite, ALH 88102, contains clasts mainly composed of py-roxene (Fs1956Wo219) with lesser amounts of plagioclase (An8692). A few poikilitic eucritic clasts and clasts containing silica (cristobalite?) veined by fayalite (Fa93) also are present.

Table 1. Meteorites from Allan Hills, Antarctica
Name Wt. Class1 Fa Fs WG2
  (g)   mol.% mol.%  
ALH 88067 13.22 H6 S2 18.9 15.7 1
ALH 88068 12.79 H6 S3 17.6 15.6 1
ALH 88069 12.86 H5 S2 18.8 15.9 1
ALH 88071 12.10 H5 S3 17.9 14.7 1
ALH 88075 10.90 H6 S2 18.9 16.3 1
ALH 88077 11.30 H4 S2 18.0 15.3 1
ALH 88079 11.36 H5 S2 18.8 16.4 1
ALH 88080 11.54 H5 S2 18.8 15.4 1
ALH 88076 11.10 H5 S3 18.3 16.0 1
ALH 88078 11.47 H6 S3 18.0 16.3 1
ALH 88082 11.43 H5-6 S3 17.2 15.3 1
ALH 88084 11.51 L6 S3 23.2 19.4 1
ALH 88085 10.15 H5 S3 18.9 18.3 1
ALH 88086 10.08 H5 S2 17.4 15.3 1
ALH 88087 10.44 H4 S2 18.0 16.3 1
ALH 88088 10.50 H5 S3 18.1 15.6 1
ALH 88089 9.16 L6 S2 24.3 20.4 1
ALH 88090 9.70 H4 S3 18.9 15.3 1
ALH 88092 9.66 H5 S2 18.1 15.4 1
ALH 88093 8.84 H5 S2 18.9 15.4 1
ALH 88094 8.27 H5 S3 17.8 17.2 1
ALH 88097 8.33 H6 S2 18.9 16.0 1
ALH 88099 8.62 H5 S2 17.8 16.1 1
ALH 88100 8.49 H5 S3 19.2 16.3 1
ALH 88101 8.16 H5-6 S3 19.2 15.7 1
ALH 88102 8.33 Howardite   19-56  
ALH 88103 6.88 H5 S2 17.6 15.2 1
ALH 88104 7.09 H5 S2 19.6 16.0 1
ALH 88105 7.38 L3 S2 6-41 3-31 2
    means: 22.9 14.1  
ALH 88106 7.22 H4 S3 18.0 15.9 1
ALH 88107 7.11 H5 S2 17.6 15.3 1
ALH 88108 7.12 H6 S3 18.4 15.7 1
ALH 88109 7.19 L6 S2 23.4 19.4 1
ALH 88110 8.30 H5 S2 18.0 16.1 1
ALH 88111 6.94 H5 S2 17.8 15.8 1
ALH 88112 6.02 H5 S2 18.2 16.0 1
ALH 88113 5.84 H5 S2 18.3 16.2 1
ALH 88114 6.42 H4 S2 18.3 16.4 1
ALH 88115 6.03 H5 S3 18.8 16.1 1
ALH 88116 6.74 H5 S2 18.1 16.3 1
ALH 88117 5.16 H6 S2 19.0 16.2 1
ALH 88118 5.72 H6 S3 17.4 16.2 1
1) Shock classification after Stöffler et al. (1991). 2) Weathering grade after Wlotzka (1993)

Baygorria
33 deg. S, 56degW (approx.) R¡o Negro Province, Uruguay

A single mass, ~80 kg, was found in a grass field near Baygorria dam. Classification (F. Wlotzka, MPI, Mainz) and analysis (B. Spettel, Max Planck Inst. fr Chemie, Mainz, Germany): Ni, 6.5%; Co, 0.43%; Ga 97.8 ppm; Ge, 10.9 ppm; Ir, 3.69 ppm; composition similar to Campo del Cielo. Specimens: main mass, contact Mr. J. Escomel, Roque Gra Seras 914, Montevideo 11300, Uruguay; type specimen, 4.6 g, MPI, Mainz.

Broken Hill
31deg. 50'S, 141 deg. 46'E

A 34 kg stone was found in an area of sand dunes. Mineralogy and classification (B. Birch, Museum of Victoria, Melbourne, Australia): homogeneous olivine, Fa25.6; feldspar, Ab84Or6; contains rare metal, abundant FeS. Specimens: main mass, Collector's Corner, Springvale Road, Keysborough, Victoria, Australia; type specimen: Museum of Victoria, 328 Swanston Road, Keysborough, Victoria, Australia.

Camel Donga 008-016
see Nullarbor Plain

Coleman
43 deg.45'40"N, 84 deg.30'30"W

Mr. Tom Hagon recovered a single pyramidal stone of 469 g that had penetrated the roof of his house. The meteorite was recovered within 12 h of observations of a bolide accompanied by a sonic boom. Mineralogy and classification (P. Sipiera and Y. Kanachi, Harper College, Palatine, Illinois): olivine, Fa28.1; pyroxene, Fs23.4; light gray, brecciated interior. Specimens: main mass, J. Schwade, 969 South Chicago St., Kankakee, IL 60901, USA; 34 g, Dept. Geology, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859, USA; other, Planetary Studies Foundation, 612 Chatham Circle, Algonquin, IL 60102, USA.

Dar al Gani 005-084
see Saharan

Garabato
28 deg. 52'S, 60 deg. 12'W

A 160 kg stone was found while plowing. Mineralogy and classifi-cation (B. Mason, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., USA): olivine, Fa19; pyroxene, Fs17; meteorite is somewhat weathered, contains ~25% Ni-Fe plus FeS. Specimens: main mass, Asociaci¢n Hatum Pampa, Pizarro 5672, (1440) Buenos Aires, Argentina; type specimen, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560, USA.

Gascoyne Junction
24 deg. 30'S, 115 deg. 11'E

50 stones totaling ~10 kg (largest, 1.6 kg) were found by a prospector in a 2 x 4 km area of a sheep station. Mineralogy and classification (C. Lewis and J. Clark, Arizona State University): olivine, Fa19. Specimens: M. and K. Killgore, Southwest Meteorite Lab, P.O. Box 95, Payson, AZ 85547, USA.

Hammadah al Hamra 042-154
see Saharan

Jolomba
Reclassification. This observed fall, reported in Met. Bull. 65 (1987), was originally classified as a diogenite. Sighinolfi et al. (1991) have reclassified Jolomba as LL6.

Majdul 001
see Saharan

Monticello
36 deg. 57'N, 84 deg. 54'W

A 210 g stone was found on the shore of Lake Cumberland. See Olsen et al. (1987) for details of classification and petrology. Note that the latitude given by Olsen et al. (1987) is incorrect. Specimens: main mass, Planetary Studies Foundation, 612 Chatham Circle, Algonquin, IL 60102, USA; type specimen, Dept. Geology, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL 60605, USA.

Nullarbor Plain
see separate entry for Yarle Lakes 003

These meteorites (Table 2) were found by the WAMET/EUROMET expeditions led by A. Bevan. Classification was done at the Natural History Museum, London, U. K. by J. Bridges, R. Hutchison, M. Grady, C. Li, and I. Lunney. Camel Donga 010, 011, 012, and 013 may be paired. Direct sample requests to Dr. A. Bevan, Western Australia Museum, Perth, Australia.

Table 2. Meteorites from the Nullarbor Plain, Western Australia
Name Lat. Long. Wt. Class1 Fa Fs WG2
  (+30°S) (+126°E) (g)   mol% mol%  
Sleeper Camp 013 7.45' 27.09' 87.4 LL5-73 S4 30.8 27.3 2-3
Camel Donga 008 6.51' 37.49' 0.8 H6 S3 19.6 17.3 3
Camel Donga 009 7.18' 53.01' 13.4 H5 S2 18.5 16.8 3
Camel Donga 010 7.53' 53.40' 3.4 L6 S3 26 22 5
Camel Donga 011 7.53' 53.40' 28.7 L6 S3 25.7 22.5 3
Camel Donga 012 8.04' 53.49' 215 L6 S3 26.1 22.3 2
Camel Donga 013 8.00' 53.43' 94.3 L6 S3 26.2 23.2 3
Camel Donga 014 7.46' 53.20' 36 LL6 S3 28.6 23.9 2
Camel Donga 015 7.18' 53.91' 0.3 H6 S3 19.9 16.8 4
Camel Donga 016 7.13' 53.12' 3.5 L3 S2-3 1-30 4-24 2
  Camel Donga 016 means: 25.7 14.8  
1) Shock classification after Stöffler et al. (1991). 2) Weathering grade after Wlotzka (1993). 3) Breccia

Perryton
36 deg. 21.2'N, 100 deg. 43.9'W

A 2.114 kg stone was found by H. Pletcher while plowing a grain field. Mineralogy and classification (J. Clark and C. Lewis, Arizona State University and A. Rubin, University of California, Los Angeles): olivine, Fa26.9; shock stage S4. Specimens: main mass, Blaine Reed, 907 County Road 207 #1, Durango, CO 81301, USA; type specimen, University of California, Los Angeles, USA.

Richfield
37 deg. 13'20"N, 101 deg. 40'53

A 40.8 kg stone was found while terracing a grain field. Minera-logy (A. Rubin, University of California, Los Angeles): olivine, Fa26.1 +- 4.6, range Fa430; Co in kamacite, 14.6 mg/g. Induced TL (P. Benoit, University of Arkansas): sensitivity, 0.25/0.24 (light/ dark); peak T 190 +-C/187 +-C; peak width, 132 +-C/131 +-C. Specimens: 1.164 kg, Arizona State University; 6 kg, Blaine Reed, 907 County Road 207 #1, Durango, CO 81301, USA; main mass, Steve Arnold, Tulsa, Oklahoma, USA.

Rio Limay
39 deg. 51'S, 69 deg. 29'W

A 280 kg stone was found by O. A. Turone and C. Oddi ~24 km NE of Qui¤ihuau. Mineralogy and classification (B. Mason, Smithsonian Institution): olivine, Fa23; pyroxene, Fs19; plagioclase, An15; shock features include black color, deformed chondrules and granu-lated minerals. Specimens: main mass, Asociaci¢n Hatum Pampa, Pizarro 5672, (1440) Buenos Aires, Argentina; type specimen, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. 20560, USA.

Saharan meteorites
Click here to see the Table of these meteorites (Table 3).

Two hundred twenty-two meteorites have been recovered from the Libyan Sahara, including the regions Hammadah al Hamra (125 meteorites), Dar al Gani (93), Sarir Quattusah (2), Sarir Tibesti (1), and Majdul (1). Table 3 lists 110 of these meteorites. Hammadah al Hamra 042-079, Majdul 001, Sarir Tibesti 001, and Sarir Quattu-sah 001 were found in 1994, the others in 1995. The CO3 chondrites, Dar al Gani 005, 006, 023, 025, and 032, are probably paired. Analysts: D. Weber, T. Grund, K. Zumdick, and A. Bischoff; clas-sification, information and type specimens: D. Weber and A. Bischoff, Institut fr Planetologie, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, 48149 Mnster, Germany. The main masses are with the anonymous finder.

Ste. Croix
46 deg. 50'12"N, 6 deg. 29'41"E

A 4.8 g iron was found near a campground. Classification and analysis (F. Wlotzka, Max Planck Inst. fr Chemie, Mainz, Ger-many): Ni, 7.64%; Ga, 20 ppm; Ge, 42 ppm; Ir, 0.148 ppm. Main mass in Swiss Meteorite Laboratory, Museum Bally-Prior, P.O. Box 126, CH-8750 Glarus, Switzerland, contact Rolf W. Bhler; 1 g in Mus‚e G‚ologique Cantonal, UNIL-BFSH 2, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland.

St-Robert
Fall Centroid 45 deg. 56'N, 72 deg. 58.5'W

Twenty pieces totaling 25.4 kg were recovered on farms near Saint-Robert(-de-Sorel) following a widely observed fireball and loud detonations (see Brown et al., 1995). The largest masses were 6.5, 5.4, 3.7, 2.3 and 1.5 kg, and 12 between 100 and 1000 g. Mineralogy and classification (G. Lecheminant and R. Herd, Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa; G. Wilson, University of Toronto): olivine, Fa18.4; pyroxene Fs18.5; contains 20% Ni-Fe, 10% FeS. Specimens: Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa; Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto; Montreal Planetarium; Queens University, Kingston; University of Western Ontario.

Sargiin Gobi
45 deg. 59.01'N, 105 deg. 45.53'E

A 17.5 kg mass was found by a Mr. Shagdarjav in the Dundgobi aimag, ~60 km NW of Mandal Gobi. See Bischoff et al. (1996) for details of classification and petrology. Main mass in Museum of Natural Sciences at Mandal Gobi, Mongolia.

Sarir Quattusah 001-002
see Saharan

Sarir Tibesti 001
see Saharan

Sleeper Camp 013
see Nullarbor Plain

Tarahumara
28 deg. 30'N, 106 deg. 15'W (approx.)

A 2.5 kg specimen was found by ranchers in high desert grazing land. Classification and petrology (J. Wasson and B. Choi, University of California, Los Angeles): Ni, 7.91%; Co, 0.47%; Ga, 26.6 ppm; Ir, 4.9 ppm; Au, 1.1 ppm; contains silicate inclusions with sodic plagioclase. Specimens: main mass, R. Haag, P.O. Box 27527, Tucson, AZ 85726, USA; type specimen, University of California, Los Angeles.

Tsukuba 36 deg. 3.8'E, 140 deg. 8.7'E (main mass)

After a luminous meteor and violent detonations, 23 stones totalling ~800 g (largest, 177.5 g) were recovered, including one that penetrated a roof. Mineralogy and classification (M. Shima and S. Yoneda, National Science Museum, Tokyo; A. Okada, Institute for Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama; S. Togashi): olivine, Fa17.9; pyroxene Fs16.5; H5 breccia contains H6 clasts; black shock veins present. Specimens: most with individuals who recovered them; type specimen, National Science Museum, 3-23-1, Hyakunin-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169, Japan.

Vermillion
39 deg. 44.18'N, 96 deg. 21.68'W

A mass of 34.36 kg was found by M. and G. Farrell while planting in a grain field. Described and classified as a "pyroxene pallasite" by Boesenberg et al. (1995). Specimens: main mass, M. and K. Killgore, Southwest Meteorite Lab, P.O. Box 95, Payson, AZ 85547, USA; 1.57 kg, Natural History Museum, London; 1.15 kg UCLA; 0.45 kg Arizona State University; 1.14 kg American Museum of Natural History, New York.

Yarle Lakes 003
30 deg. 16.8'S, 131 deg. 21.5'E

A 14 g stone was found by a rabbit hunter. Mineralogy and classification (J. Otto, Mineralogische-Petrographisches Institut, Freiburg, Germany): olivine, Fa25.1; pyroxene, Fs21.1; feldspar, Ab85.4 Or4.4. Specimens: main mass, P. Beekhaus, Kehrsatz, Switzerland; type specimen, Mineralogische-Petrographisches Institut, Albert-strasse 23b, D-79104 Freiburg, Germany.

AcknowledgementsThis Bulletin was prepared by the Meteorite Nomenclature Committee of the Meteoritical Society under the Editorship of J. N. Grossman. Members for 1996 are A. W. R. Bevan, M. M. Grady, M. Ivanova, M. M. Lindstrom, N. Nakamura, M. Prinz, A. E. Rubin (Chair), D. Stoffler, M. Wadhwa and S. Wang. Thanks go to John Slack and John Morgan for their reviews.

REFERENCES
Bischoff A. and Geiger T. (1995) Meteorites from the Sahara: Find locations, shock classification, degree of weathering and pairing. Meteoritics 30, 113-22.

Bischoff A., Gerel O., Buchwald V. F., Spettel B., Loeken T., Schultz L., Weber H. W., Schlüter J., Baljinnyam L., Borch-uluun D., Byambaa C. and Garamjav D. (1996) Meteorites from Mongolia. Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 31, 152-57.

Boesenberg J. S., Prinz M., Weisberg M. K., Davis A. M., Clayton R. N., Mayeda T. K. and Wasson J. T. (1995) Pyroxene pallasites: A new pallasite grouplet (abstract). Meteoritics 30, 488-89.

Brown P., Hildebrand A., Green D., Page D., Jacobs C., Revelle D., Tagliaferri E. and Wacker J. (1995) The fall of the St. Robert meteorite: Interpretation of eyewitness accounts, satellite data, short-lived isotope activity, and infrasound (abstract). Meteoritics 30, 492.

Jäckel A., Bischoff A., Clayton R. N. and Mayeda T. K. (1996) Dar al Gani 013- new Saharan Rumuruti-chondrite (R3-6) with highly unequilibrated (Type 3) fragments (abstract). Lunar Planet. Sci. 27, 595-96.

Olsen E. J., Dod B. D., Schmitt R. A. and Sipiera P. P. (1987) Monticello: A glass-rich howardite. Meteoritics 22, 81-6.

Palme H., Weckwerth D. and Wolf D. (1996) The composition of the new R-chondrites and the classification of chondritic meteorites (abstract). Lunar Planet. Sci. 27, 991-92.

Sighinolfi G. P., Garutti G. and Morais E. (1991) The Jolomba, Angola, LL6 chondrite. Meteoritics 26, 27-9.

Stöffler D., Keil K. and Scott E. R. D. (1991) Shock metamorphism of ordinary chondrites. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 55, 3845-867.

Weber D. and Bischoff A. (1996) New meteorite finds from the Libyan Sahara (abstract). Lunar Planet. Sci. 27, 1393-1394.

Weber D., Clayton R. N., Mayeda T.K. and Bischoff A. (1996) Unusual equilibrated carbonaceous chondrites and CO3 meteorites from the Sahara (abstract). Lunar Planet. Sci. 27, 1395-396.

Wlotzka F. (1993) A weathering scale for the ordinary chondrites (abstract). Meteoritics 28, 460.