header
  MetSoc Home            Publications            Contacts  
Search the Meteoritical Bulletin Database
Last update: 18 Aug 2019
Search for: Search type: Search limits: Display: Publication:
Names
Text help
Places
Classes
Years
Contains
Starts with
Exact
Sounds like
NonAntarctic
Falls  Non-NWAs
What's new
  in the last:
Limit to approved meteorite names
Search text:  
Kirkland
Basic information Name: Kirkland
     This is NOT an official name: Pseudo meteorite.
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite.
Observed fall: Yes
Year fell: 1955
Country: United States
Mass:help 232 g
Classification
  history:
Meteoritical Bulletin:  MB 25  (1962)  Iron
MB 29  (1964)  Pseudometeorite
MetBase:  v. 7.1  (2006)  Pseudometeorite
Recommended:  Pseudometeorite    [explanation]

Writeuphelp
Writeup from MB 25:
Warning: the following text was scanned and may contain character recognition errors. Refer to the original to be sure of accuracy.

An article by M. W. Rowe, M. A. Van Dilla, E. C. Anderson: «On the Radioactivity of Iron Meteorites». J. Geophys. Res. 67, 9, 3594, 1962, reports about a new iron meteorite, Seattle, Washington, USA, which consists of two specimens with a total weight of 232 g that, fell on January 17, 1955.


Writeup from MB 28:
Warning: the following text was scanned and may contain character recognition errors. Refer to the original to be sure of accuracy.

NEW KIRKLAND IRON METEORITE, USA

Name: KIRKLAND. (See: Seattle, M. B., No. 25,1962).

The place of fall or discovery:  Approximately two miles northeast of Kirkland, Wash­ington, USA: φ = 42°41'35"N; λ = 122°10'13" W.

Date of fall or discovery:. FALL, January 17, 1955, approximately 11ha.

Class and type: IRON.

Number of individual specimens: 2

Total weight: 232.4 gr (119.2 and 113.2 gr).

Circumstances of the fall or discovery:  The meteorite fell on a cloudy winter day typical of the seaboard. Mr. Hawthorne, owner of an amateur astronomical observatory was puttering about when he heard a sudden loud report like «dynamite exploding». The meteorite pierced the observatory dome at azi­muth N 12.5° E at angle of 27° to the horizontal. Mr. Hawthorne found the two meteorite fragments inside the observatory. Cloudiness prevented observation of the bolide.

Source: An Article: W. F. Read (Appleton, USA), «Kirkland - A Questioned Fall», «Meteoritics», the Journal of the Meteoritical Society, v. 2, No 1, May, 1963, 56-64.


Writeup from MB 29:
Warning: the following text was scanned and may contain character recognition errors. Refer to the original to be sure of accuracy.

A letter from Dr. E. P. Henderson (Washington, USA) of December 18, 1963 reports that both specimens of Kirkland meteorite (see Meteoritical Bulletin, No 28, Oc­tober, 1963) are Canyon Diablo individuals, but they are not pieces of the new Kirk­land meteorite.

Buchwald The following entries were found for Kirkland in Buchwald (1975)
[Buchwald, Vagn F. (1975) Handbook of Iron Meteorites. University of California Press, 1418 pp.]
Catalogs:
References: Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 25, Moscow (1962)
Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 28, Moscow (1963)
Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 29, Moscow (1964)
Find references in NASA ADS:
Find references in Google Scholar:
Geography:

United States
Coordinates:
     Catalogue of Meteorites:   (42° 41' 35"N, 122° 10' 13"W)
     Recommended::   (47° 41' 35"N, 122° 10' 13"W)
Note: the NHM and MetBase coordinates are 555.7 km apart
Proximity search:
Find nearby meteorites: enter search radius (km):
Synonymshelp: Seattle (In NHM Cat)

Direct link to this page