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Vilna
Basic information Name: Vilna
     This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name.
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite.
Observed fall: Yes
Year fell: 1967
Country: Canada
Mass:help 0.1 g
Classification
  history:
Meteoritical Bulletin:  MB 40  (1967)  Chondrite
NHM Catalogue:  5th Edition  (2000)  L5
MetBase:  v. 7.1  (2006)  L5
Recommended:  L5    [explanation]

This is 1 of 6289 approved meteorites (plus 3 unapproved names) classified as L5.   [show all]
Search for other: L chondrites, L chondrites (type 4-7), Ordinary chondrites, and Ordinary chondrites (type 4-7)
Writeuphelp
Writeup from MB 40:
Warning: the following text was scanned and may contain character recognition errors. Refer to the original to be sure of accuracy.

FALL OF VILNA STONY METEORITE, CANADA

Name: VILNA.

The place of fall or discovery: 15 km northeast of the village of Vilna, Alberta, Canada;

 φ = 54°16' N, λ = 111°40'W.

Date of fall or discovery: FALL, February 5, 1967, 18 hrs 55'40" Mountain Standard Time.

Class and type: STONY, gray chondrite.

Number of individual specimens: 1.

Total weight: Less than one gram.

Circumstances of the fall or discovery: A bright detonating bolide passed directly over the National Research Council auroral observatory at Meanook, Alberta, and was recorded on the all-sky camera as a bright streak with an azimuth of 110°. Its detonations were clearly recorded on the seismograph of the University of Alberta at a distance of 110 km as air blasts. An ellipse of fall was predicted from the photographic record and abundant ground observations of the bolide. The first fragment was recovered by T. Reiruchen a student of the University of Alberta from the surface of two feet of drifted snow. Observors of the fall area heard many fragments whizzing through the air and striking the snow.

Source: Report of Prof. R. E. Folinsbee (Edmonton, Canada) in a letter 11.10 1967.

Catalogs:
References: Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 40, Moscow (1967) reprinted Met. 5, 85-109 (1970)
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Geography:

Canada
Coordinates:
     Catalogue of Meteorites:   (54° 13' 30"N, 111° 41' 30"W)
     Recommended::   (54° 13' 30"N, 111° 41' 30"W)
Note: the NHM and MetBase coordinates are 0.7 m apart

Statistics:
     This is 1 of 17 approved meteorites from Alberta, Canada (plus 3 impact craters)
     This is 1 of 65 approved meteorites from Canada (plus 5 unapproved names) (plus 31 impact craters)
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Synonymshelp: Lac Labiche (In NHM Cat)

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