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Whetstone Mountains
Basic information Name: Whetstone Mountains
     This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name.
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite.
Observed fall: Yes
Year fell: 2009
Country: United States
Mass:help 2.14 kg
Classification
  history:
Meteoritical Bulletin:  MB 99  (2011)  H5
Recommended:  H5    [explanation]

This is 1 of 10899 approved meteorites (plus 19 unapproved names) classified as H5.   [show all]
Search for other: H chondrites, H chondrites (type 4-7), Ordinary chondrites, and Ordinary chondrites (type 4-7)
Comments: Approved 1 Sep 2009
Revised 31 Jul 2012: Released coordinates
Writeuphelp
Writeup from MB 99:

Whetstone Mountains                      31.938626°N, 110.424477°W   

Cochise County, Arizona, United States

Fall: June 23, 2009 at 9:22 p.m. MST (UTC -7 hours)

      Classification: Ordinary chondrite (H5 breccia)

History:  A bright fireball with detonations and rumblings was observed by many witnesses.  Carl Hergenrother  estimated magnitude -11 fireball that created shadows, lasted for at least ~2 seconds moving from the southeast part of the sky to the east and downward.  Part of the path was recorded by the All-Sky camera at the UA-Multiple-Mirror Telescope facility on Mt. Hopkins and a security camera in Marana, AZ.  Jack L. Schrader interviewed eye-witnesses and recovered the first 155.86 g stone on the surface of the high desert less than 45 hours after the fall. Within a month of its fall, additional stones were found by Chuck Schrader, Shauna Russell, Robert Ward, Todd Parker, and Michael Farmer. Strewnfield occupies an ~3 x 6 km ellipse, trending N 30° E. Coordinates given are approximately at the center of the strewnfield.

Physical characteristics:  Total known mass as of July 15, 2009 is 2138.74 g among 10 stones.  All except one were recovered as intact individuals with complete fusion crust.  Some stones exhibit regmaglypts. Fusion crust is fresh, matte black. One stone exhibits a fusion crust with a reddish hue (not oxidation) and others contain a few “bluish” spots.

Petrography D. H. Hill (UAz): Well-defined chondrules (200-700 μm) with porphyritic olivine and pyroxene chondrules being most abundant.  Metal grains up to 800 μm and troilite up to 300 μm occur between chondrules in approximately 1:1 proportion.  Many metal grains exhibit fingerlike intergrowth of kamacite and taenite.  Mg-bearing phosphates ~100 x 200 μm occur between chondrules.  A crushed texture is observed that corresponds to a lighter lithology in a darker groundmass.  Shock veins are visible in the hand specimen.  There are two 350 μm chromite-rich clasts.

Mineral compositions and geochemistry: D. H. Hill (UAz) EMP: Olivine (Fa18.82±0.25); pyroxene (Fs16.56±0.49Wo1.77±1.7); kamacite (Ni 6.71% ± 0.28; Co 0.49% ± 0.03), taenite (26% Ni and ~40 % Ni (tetrataenite?); phosphates are mostly Mg-rich with a few Cl-bearing.  

Classification: Ordinary chondrite (H5) breccia; W0

Type specimens: A total sample mass of 20.36 g is on deposit at UAz and 131 g at ASU. Jack L. Schrader holds 787.92 g; Chuck Schrader holds 99.61 g; Shauna Russell holds 465.83 g; Ward holds 397 g; Todd Parker holds 218 g.
 
Institutions
   and collections
ASU: Center for Meteorite Studies, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1404, United States; Website (institutional address; updated 14 Jan 2012)
UAz: Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 E. University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721, United States (institutional address; updated 14 Jan 2012)
Catalogs:
References: Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 99, April 2012, MAPS 47, E1-E52 (2012) [published online only]
Find references in NASA ADS:
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Photos:
CreditPhotos
Photos uploaded by members of the Encyclopedia of Meteorites.
    (Caution, these are of unknown reliability)
Dave Gheesling Photo added 19 Apr 2022
Gerald Armstrong Photo added 19 Apr 2022
Jim K Photo added 19 Apr 2022
MeteoriteCollector.org - FCOM - Russ Finney Photo added 19 Apr 2022
Photo added 19 Apr 2022
Photo added 19 Apr 2022
Michael S. Scherman Photo added 19 Apr 2022
Woreczko Jan & Wadi Photo added 19 Apr 2022
Geography:

United States
Coordinates:
     Recommended::   (31° 56' 19"N, 110° 25' 28"W)

Statistics:
     This is 1 of 178 approved meteorites from Arizona, United States (plus 1 impact crater)
     This is 1 of 1886 approved meteorites from United States (plus 890 unapproved names) (plus 28 impact craters)
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