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Derrick Peak 00200
Basic information Name: Derrick Peak 00200
     This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name.
Abbreviation: DRP 00200
Observed fall: No
Year found: 2000
Country: Antarctica [Collected by US Antarctic Search for Meteorites program (ANSMET)]
Mass:help 10 kg
Classification
  history:
NHM Catalogue:  5th Edition  (2000)  IIAB
Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter:  AMN 24(2)  (2001)  IIAB
Meteoritical Bulletin:  MB 86  (2002)  IIAB
MetBase:  v. 7.1  (2006)  IIB
Recommended:  Iron, IIAB    [explanation]

This is 1 of 137 approved meteorites classified as Iron, IIAB.   [show all]
Search for other: IIAB irons, Iron meteorites, and Metal-rich meteorites
Writeuphelp
Writeup from AMN 24(2):
Sample No.: DRP 00200; 00201
Location: Derrick Peak
Field No.: 12000; 12299
Dimensions (cm): 24.0x10.0x12.5;
14.0x10.0x8.0
Weight (g): 10,000.0; 2689.4
Meteorite Type: Iron-IIAB
    DRP00200 DRP00201

Macroscopic Description: Tim McCoy
These two masses each exhibit a highly corroded and discolored surface, where they were in contact with the soil on Derrick Peak, and a shiny brown surface. The upper surface is highly pitted. The larger of the two masses exhibits prominent linear protrusions of resistant schreibersite crystals in depressions formed by severe terrestrial weathering and removal of the original surface. These depressions are aligned, probably reflecting alignment of the resistant schreibersite.

Microscopic Description: Tim McCoy
On a cut surface, these are typical members of the Derrick Peak iron shower (Clarke, Meteoritics 17, 129). Only a thin layer of corrosion is found on the surface and neither fusion crust nor heat-altered zone is found. Structurally, they are coarsest octahedrites with large areas of swathing kamacite enclosing elongate, skeletal schreibersite crystals and cm-sized round troilite inclusions. Like other Derrick Peak irons, they are certainly members of group IIAB.

Data from:
  MB86
  Table A1
  Line 2:
Mass (g):10000
Class:IIAB
Weathering grade:B
Catalogs:
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References: Published in Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter 24(2) (2001), JSC, Houston
Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 86, MAPS 37, A157-A184 (2002)
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Photos:
CreditPhotos
Photographs from AMN:
Photograph from unknown source A photo is in the write-up above
Photos from the Encyclopedia of Meteorites:
Dr Carlton Allen, JSC-KT, NASA   
Geography:

Antarctica
Coordinates:
     Catalogue of Meteorites:   (80° 4'S, 156° 23'E)
     Recommended::   (80° 4'S, 156° 23'E)

Statistics:
     This is 1 of 39173 approved meteorites from Antarctica (plus 5051 unapproved names)
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