header
  MetSoc Home            Publications            Contacts  
Search the Meteoritical Bulletin Database
Last update: 18 May 2022
Search for: Search type: Search limits: Display: Publication:
Names
Text help
Places
Classes
Years
Contains
Starts with
Exact
Sounds like
NonAntarctic
Falls  Non-NWAs
What's new
  in the last:
Limit to approved meteorite names
Search text:  
Niger (L6)
Basic information Name: Niger (L6)
     This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name.
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite.
Observed fall: Yes
Year fell: 1967
Country: Niger
Mass:help 114.2 g
Classification
  history:
NHM Catalogue:  5th Edition  (2000)  L6
MetBase:  v. 7.1  (2006)  L6
Recommended:  L6    [explanation]

This is 1 of 12058 approved meteorites (plus 6 unapproved names) classified as L6.   [show all]
Search for other: L chondrites, L chondrites (type 4-7), Ordinary chondrites, and Ordinary chondrites (type 4-7)
Comments: Revised 22 May 2022: Consolidation of Niger masses
Writeuphelp
Writeup from MB 111:
Abolishment of Niger (LL6) as a distinct fall.

Christophe Michel-Levy (1969) declared two ordinary chondrites Niger II and Niger III, which the Meteoritical Bulletin call Niger (LL6) and Niger (L6). Little material (3.3 g and 2.72 g) remained, as a result of a destructive analysis before their meteoritic nature came to be seriously considered at the Service des Mines National (SODEMI) of Côte d’Ivoire. One of them is reportedly associated to an observed fall near the village of Koutiaran (Mirria district) on August 1, 1967, but Christophe Michel-Levy (1969) was unsure which. The Meteoritical Bulletin Database has, until now, attributed that fall date both stones, under separate names. Dr Christophe also donated a 104.3 g undeclared meteorite to MNHNP, entered as “Koutiaran” in its catalog (no. 3471), again assigned the same fall date, and indicated to be “maybe Niger.” It is briefly mentioned in Christophe Michel-Levy and Ragot (1971) as an “hypersthene chondrite” (consistent with its newly measured logX = 4.80). Suspicion was thus aroused that the three meteorites may be actually paired.

Macroscopic and microscopic examination of sections of all three samples shows similar type 6 petrographies, with no apparent weathering. Electron microprobe analyses yielded (± 1 SD): Niger II ("LL6"), inv. 3472, Fa25.1±0.2 (N=4), Fs21.0±0.4 (N=3); Niger III ("L6"), Inv. 3473, Fa25.2±0.5 (N=6) Fs20.9±0.2 (N=3); "Koutiaran," Inv. 3471, Fa25.3±0.1 (N=3), Fs21.6±0.5 (N=3). These are indistinguishable results, consistent with an L6 classification for all stones. The Fa30 composition, which Christophe Michel-Levy (1969) obtained from X-ray diffraction patterns for Niger II, were likely in error. The three specimens are evidently paired L6 chondrites. The name "Niger LL6" is hereby abolished, and the mass of all three (114.2 g) are henceforth considered part of Niger (L6).
Bibliography:
  • Christophe Michel-Levy M. (1969) Three new meteorite finds in Niger. Meteoritics 4. 283 (abstract) (link)
  • Christophe Michel-Levy M. and Ragot J.P. (1971) La texture des chondrotes observee en plaques minces par fluorescence ultraviolette.Meteoritics 6, 217-224 (link)
Institutions
   and collections
MNHNP: Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, IMPMC-CP52, 57 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris, France, France; Website (institutional address)
Catalogs:
References: Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 111, in preparation (2022)
Find references in NASA ADS:
Find references in Google Scholar:
Geography:

Niger
Coordinates:Unknown.

Statistics:
     This is 1 of 93 approved meteorites from Niger (plus 4 unapproved names)
Synonymshelp: Niger (III) (In NHM Cat)

Direct link to this page