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Riverton
Basic information Name: Riverton
     This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name.
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite.
Observed fall: No
Year found: 1960
Country: Canada
Mass:help 103.3 g
Classification
  history:
Meteoritical Bulletin:  MB 54  (1976)  H5
NHM Catalogue:  5th Edition  (2000)  H5
MetBase:  v. 7.1  (2006)  H5
Recommended:  H5    [explanation]

This is 1 of 10280 approved meteorites (plus 18 unapproved names) classified as H5.   [show all]
Search for other: H chondrites, H chondrites (type 4-7), Ordinary chondrites, and Ordinary chondrites (type 4-7)
Writeuphelp
Writeup from MB 54:
Warning: the following text was scanned and may contain character recognition errors. Refer to the original to be sure of accuracy.

DISCOVERY OF THE RIVERTON, MANITOBA, STONY METEORITE

Name: RIVERTON

Place of find: 7 km south of Riverton, Manitoba, Canada. 50°56.4'N, 96°59.5' W.

Date of ford: 1960 or 1961, recognized 1968

Class and type: Stone. Olivine-bronzite chondrite (H5) (Olivine Fa20.1 by microprobe analysis)

Number of individual specimens: 1, now in three pieces.

Total weight: 103.3 g

Circumstances of find: One stone was picked up in a pasture in the southwest quarter of section 33 of township 22, range 4E, Manitoba (lat. 50°56.4'N; long. 96°59.5'W), about 7 km south of Riverton, Manitoba and about 2 km west of the western shore of Lake Winnipeg. The field has since been broken out and planted. The stone was first recognized by Glenn Huss in 1968, at which time it was in three distinctly weathered pieces weighing 76.2 g, 24.8 g, and 2.3 g. The first and third pieces are at the American Meteorite Laboratory, Denver, Colorado; the 24.8 g piece is now in the National Meteorite Collection, Ottawa. Examination of the latter shows it to be strongly fractured, with the metals oxidised to a considerable extent. Chondrules with typical textures are well preserved. The classification is based on microprobe analysis of 10 olivine crystals of uniform composition.

Sources: Glenn I Huss, American Meteorite Laboratory, Denver, Colorado 80201 USA, H.R. Steacy and A.G. Plant, Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1A OE8, M.R. Dence, Earth Physics Branch, Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, KIA OE4.

Catalogs:
References: Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 54, Meteoritics 11, 69-93 (1976)
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Geography:

Canada
Coordinates:
     Catalogue of Meteorites:   (50° 56' 24"N, 96° 59' 30"W)
     Recommended::   (50° 56' 24"N, 96° 59' 30"W)
Note: the NHM and MetBase coordinates are 0.7 m apart

Statistics:
     This is 1 of 6 approved meteorites from Manitoba, Canada (plus 2 impact craters)
     This is 1 of 65 approved meteorites from Canada (plus 5 unapproved names) (plus 31 impact craters)
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