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Montferré
Basic information Name: Montferré
     This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name.
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite.
Observed fall: Yes
Year fell: 1923
Country: France
Mass:help 149 kg
Classification
  history:
Meteoritical Bulletin:  MB 51  (1972)  L
NHM Catalogue:  5th Edition  (2000)  H5
MetBase:  v. 7.1  (2006)  H5
Recommended:  H5    [explanation]

This is 1 of 9440 approved meteorites (plus 11 unapproved names) classified as H5.   [show all]
Search for other: H chondrites, H chondrites (type 4-7), Ordinary chondrites, and Ordinary chondrites (type 4-7)
Writeuphelp
Writeup from MB 51:
Warning: the following text was scanned and may contain character recognition errors. Refer to the original to be sure of accuracy.

DISCOVERY AND ASSUMED FALL OF THE MONTFERRE, FRANCE, STONY METEORITE

Name: MONTFERRE

Place of find: Montferre, near Castelnaudary, in Treville, Department of Aude, France.

43° 23'26"N, 1° 57'45"E.

Date of fall: Presumed to have been a night in the summer of 1923.

Class and type: Stone. Olivine-hypersthene chondrite.

Number of individual specimens: 1

Total weight: 149 kg

Circumstances of find: During a night in the summer of 1923, M. de Bataille, chatting with some friends in the enclosure of his property of Grouaulet, saw at a slight altitude a very bright, greenish object, accompanied by a whistling sound and traveling in a south-north direction. This object left in the sky, up to the instant of the presumed fall, a strong light perceptable for some time. One of his companions, running astonished, rushed forward in the direction of the impact but found nothing. The incident was not forgotten by the witnesses. After a number of years, the plowshare of the plow of M. Krivobokow, working the farm of Gravette, got hung up on a hard,-embedded mass. In 1966, he decided to extricate it. The appearance of the "rock", abnormal in the clay-like soil of the region, brought to mind the story of his neighbor. In June 1971, during a prospecting mission of the Commission on Atomic Energy, a geologist instituted the previous deduction and confirmed that the object was a meteorite. It was recovered with a thin crust of iron hydroxides of a thickness of 1 to 2 mm, and exhibited the very characteristic cup-like structures and shatter cones.

Source: Yves Gillet, Commissariat, a L'Energie Atomique, Servie de Mineralogie, Direction des Productions - B.P. no. 4 - 92 Chatillion-sous-Bagneux, France.

Catalogs:
Search for this meteorite in the Natural History Museum collection (U.K.):   
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References: Published in Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 51, Meteoritics 7, 215-232 (1972)
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Photos:
CreditPhotos
Photos from the Encyclopedia of Meteorites:
Michael Cottingham   
Photos uploaded by members of the Encyclopedia of Meteorites.
    (Caution, these are of unknown reliability)
Jean-Michel Masson         
Geography:

France
Coordinates:
     Catalogue of Meteorites:   (43° 23' 26"N, 1° 57' 45"E)
     Recommended::   (43° 23' 26"N, 1° 57' 45"E)
Note: the NHM and MetBase coordinates are 1.1 m apart

Statistics:
     This is 1 of 5 approved meteorites from Languedoc-Roussillon, France
     This is 1 of 76 approved meteorites from France (plus 11 unapproved names) (plus 1 impact crater)
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